1 Dec 2022

Manchester

more Vini gold.

'These tracks are absolutely exquisite but rarely heard, My favourite DC album was made around the same time, "Vini Reilly" in 1989, and this collection really does carry on in the same vein, I was actually thinking about Vini, today, after the recent, sad passing of Keith Levene (one of Reilly's few peers as a guitarist). I wonder how he is, the old boy?' -Richard Simpson

Vini Reilly & Bruce Mitchell

Burned Beans
'Vini could have very easily sold his exceptional talents for fame and fortune...instead he stayed true to his art. I have so much respect for Vini Reilly. Master musician...master composer.' 

grizcuz
'One of the very few modern musicians to only ever play/compose/record exactly what he wanted to, when he wanted to. Without giving consideration to the financial or critical reception he would receive from doing so.

I think Tony Wilson/Factory deserve a mention for supporting DC/VR as well though, they pretty much released DC LP's through the 80's 'no questions asked'. He'd write some songs, they'd give him a recording budget, he'd deliver the master tapes, it would be released. Not many, if any, other record labels would give someone such artistic freedom. Especially when DC were hardly known for releasing big selling, accessible LP's. I know TW and VR did occasionally have their disagreements, but they'd always 'make up' and it was a friendship that lasted until Wilson's early demise.

I once had the pleasure of spending a few hours in Vini's company in Dry Bar during a 'private party' one weekday afternoon in the early 90's (I have friends who work/ed for the biggest selling Factory band). He never tired of me asking about his playing/equipment and how he went about writing. It was just after 'Obey the Time' had been released and I was listening to it a lot at the time. He's such an unassuming and relaxed chap as well, I don't think anyone else on Factory in that period would have spent that amount of time with someone they'd never met before just answering questions. So, I have a lot of time for Vini's music and Vini as a person. I did feel that he was a man that wasn't really suited to the cut throat nature of the modern music business though. He was probably the most talented musician in that room, but also the quietest. He certainly wasn't there for the free bar and food, I remember he was drinking Appletise and he drunk about 3 of them over the afternoon, he did like smoking cigs though, we went through a pack of B&H between the two of us.'

Burned Beans
'@grizcuz  Thanks for sharing that. Meeting Vini would be great but I couldn't take him putting down his own music. Vini has called his music "rubbish" and "just tunes" which boggles my mind. "The Room" from this Domo live set is just incredible.'

grizcuz
@Burned Beans  I think him putting his own music down is just a part of a Northern/Mancunian self deprecating personality. We tend not to like people who think and say that they're the bee's knees. I've found that the few famous musicians that I've met are like that, more willing to talk up other people's music than their own. Hopefully, deep down he knows that he's got a back catalogue that will be enjoyed for decades to come.


Vini Reilly – The Sporadic Recordings

Label: TTTTTTTTT – SPORE 1
Format: CD, Album, Compilation, Limited Edition, Numbered
Country: UK
Released: Dec 1989
Style: Avant garde, Jazz, Classical

The Sporadic Recordings, A TTTTTTTTT'S RELEASE. Limited Edition of 4000, not sure how many were signed like this one. Features tracks such as Shirt No. 7 (for Pat Nevin the Scottish footballer), For Steven Patrick (for Morrissey) and Rob Gray's Elegy. Total running time 72.25, 28 tracks. Credited to Vini Reilly and not The Durutti Column.

Most of the tracks on this album were later re-released on Kooky Records' 'The Return of the Sporadic Recordings' which was a double cd combining one disc with all of The Sporadic Recordings (except for those tracks which had already been released as extra tracks on the Factory Once re-releases) and a second disc with new tracks, rarities, and outtakes, etc.

At the end of the last track there is an audio clip of Vini Reilly at an international border checkpoint. The immigration official can be heard asking Vini what he does for a living. Vini replies that he is a musician. The official asks what type of music. After barely a beat Vini replies 'Avant garde jazz classical'.

Tracklisting and notes
1. Buddhist Prayer -- Played on Charlie's L14 guitar after reading 'Page after Page' and not being disappointed. Starring Japanese monks.
2. Pathway -- This is how far you can 'pull' strings before they (or your fingers) snap.
3. Nile Opera -- Starring Egyptian drummers discovered in Andy's obscure C.D. collection.
4. Shirt No. 7 -- Starring a vintage semi-acoustic Gibson 'Stereo-Switchmaster' -- not plugged in.
5. Kind Of Love -- Jazzers would call it syncopation but the time signature was irretrievably lost two bars in and never found again.
6. Rob Gray's Elegy -- Starring Rob's harmonica and Jeremy Kerr's bass.
7. Misere -- Starring the most beautiful voice EVER.
8. For Steven Patrick -- ...for Steven Patrick with love and affection.
9. We Stumble -- Recorded in Belgium for Michel Duval.
10. Sketch For A Manchester Summer 1989 -- The essential Mancunian summer, captured on DAT before the greenhouse effect changes the climate irrevocably.
11. Arpeggiator II -- Starring a now obsolete gimmick.
12. Diazepam 5 mgs -- (Enough to relax you.) Starring a very expensive Bosendorfer piano played on a very cheap synth.
13. But Was I...? -- An attempt to disguise voices through the S.P.X. 90 mk.1.
14. Pol In A-flat -- Played through an ancient Space Echo, therefore the hiss is compulsory.
15. Real Drums -- Real Drummer -- Starring Bruce Mitchell demonstrating the inadequacies of computer generated drums.
16. Another Mirror -- Another Wall -- Another Michel Duval project. Another song with these lyrics, starring Pol's voice and Alain Lefebvre's congas.
17. 30 Oldham Street -- In praise of DRY's decaffeinated coffee and in spite of Leroy's jokes.
18. 4.10 am -- Recorded then.
19. For Lydia-- Voices and flute played on a keyboard.
20. Detail For Heidi And Jodie -- Played on a Yamaha owned by the recipients of the tune.
21. Zinni's Dance -- Bruce's daughter's birthday tune. Played the way she dances, -- out of time.
22. PPP Version -- Based on a description by Anthony H. of a park in Hong Kong.
23. For Lucy H. -- Dedicated to a very nice old lady who lived and died alone. Starring the trumpet of Kaire Gedal.
24. 4.30 am -- Slightly later the same morning.
25. It's A Bright Guilty World -- Part I -- Inspired by an Orson Welles interview.
26. It's A Bright Guilty World -- Part II 
27. Nile Reprise -- See Track 3 
28. Diazepam 10 mgs -- Enough to send you to sleep?

Notes

All songs [...] published by: The Movement of the 24th January / Zomba Music.

As always the music produced itself.

Recorded mostly at Sporadic Studios, Manchester (plugged in by Paul Miller) except: [track 6 and 23] Out of the Blue, Manchester (plugged in by Nick Gartside).

Special thanks to Factory Communications Ltd., and particularly Anthony H. Wilson, Tina Simmons and Bruce Mitchell, without whose help and guidance this project would not have materialised.

Thanks to Tony Michaelides and Picadilly Radio for the use of 'Lucy H.'. This track was recorded in March 1987, during a session for Tony the Greek's 'The Last Radio Programme'.

Thanks also to Karl Lynch for NE 5532 and Stuart James and the Canadian Customs & Excise for the closing statement.

Finally thanks to Michel Duval and David Handley.

Respect and thanks to those we have sampled.

℗ + © 1989 Sporadic Productions

This C.D. is a limited edition of 4000.

Warning: this C.D. contains music of a non-ambient nature.

Packaging: standard jewel case with 12-page booklet with stamp numbering